Important news regarding the future of Enfield Museum Service and Local Studies Library Read  

Enfield Archaeological Society

Founded in 1955, the Enfield Archaeological Society is active in carrying out research and fieldwork in and around the London Borough of Enfield, in order to understand and preserve its history.

Our main aims are: to promote the practice and study of archaeology in the district; to record and preserve all finds in the borough and encourage others to allow their finds to be recorded by the Society; and to co-operate with neighbouring societies with similar aims.

Membership is open to anybody with an interest in the past.

The Enfield Archaeological Society is affiliated to the Council for British Archaeology and the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society; the President for the society is Harvey Sheldon, B.Sc, F.S.A, F.R.S.A.

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The Society has an active programme of fieldwork including annual research excavations on the sites of former Tudor and Jacobean palaces, and rescue work throughout the year including work on Roman roadside settlements, iron-age hillforts and others in and around Enfield.


Research work varies from casual field-walks, map regression and documentary research, remote sensing study and ground survey work. The Society has several publications both in and out of print; our most recent book is Enfield at War 1914-1918, by Geoffrey Gillam and revised by Ian Jones.


We are keen wherever possible to share the results of our work: Our summer digs take place as part of the CBA's national Festival of Archaeology, during which we give tours and talks to the public as well as school parties, in co-operation with Enfield Council.

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October 6th 2015

Enfield Museum Cuts — Update

The Enfield Society have published more details on the proposed cuts to Enfield Museum Service and the Local Studies Library — you can read the full article here. This confirms many of our concerns, including further budget cuts, staff reduction and an end to exhibitions.

The Museum of London's Regional Museum Development Managaer has also responded to the consultation:

  Enfield Council is running a public consultation on the future of its museum and local studies services. This comes in the light of very significant savings which Enfield, in common with other councils in London, has to make this year. The consultation questionnaire can be found on the council web site here.

The wording of the consultation is slightly misleading in that rather than just 'moving' the museum from the ground to the 1st floor of the Dugdale Centre in Enfield town centre, the proposal is actually to close the vibrant exhibition space on the ground floor, which has been attracting 25,000 people a year, leaving just the existing permanent local history displays on the 1st floor. What the consultation also doesn't mention is that the council are planning to further reduce the museum staff team from 2.5 posts to just a solitary Museum Officer, with no budget to mount any programmes or activities. There are therefore serious concerns about the future viability of the museum service.

We are providing an official response questioning the disproportionate harm to the cultural life of the borough which will result from such a tiny saving, and we are in touch with other sector bodies such as London Museums Group and Museums Association who will be making similar responses. Individuals are encouraged to respond using the questionnaire on the above council web page. The number of responses will be important. The council's overriding concern will be the number of from Enfield council tax payers, so if that applies to you do respond in that capacity, and encourage any of your friends who live in Enfield to so the same.

The consultation closes on 18 October.  

Ben Travers Regional Museum Development Manager, Museum of London
September 7th 2015


A message from the EAS Executive Committee:

The EAS committee would like to draw your attention to a consultation being undertaken by Enfield Borough Council (closing on the 18th October) about the future of the Local Studies Library and Enfield Museum (see

We are concerned that the proposals may be intended as a first step in justifying the closure of one or both services and even if not, would, we think, mark the end of museum exhibitions and curtail access to the library.

Without the museum especially, archaeology in the borough would become virtually impossible and their collections, which represent everything known about Roman Enfield and Elsyng Palace could be in jeopardy.

We urge you to fill in the consultation survey on line ( or by collecting a paper version from the Local Studies Library and express your deep concern about the implications of the curtailment of these services.

You can contact the EAS committee regarding this matter at the addresses given above ("Contact Us"), or at committee

  • 19 Jul 2015

    Festival Of Archaeology 2015 - Forty Hall - Day 6

    garderobe chute

    the garderobe(s)

    An arduous but thoroughly rewarding final day’s digging in Forty Hall saw the sun shine despite poor forecasts, which thankfully let us crack on and achieve almost all of our principal objectives, and brought a sizeable crowd to witness the fantastic archaeology our trench finally produced.

    Yesterday we had removed most of a top layer of sandy rubble from the top of our newly discovered garderobe chute – the layer below seemed to be more solid and our hopes that it would contain useful finds were thoroughly fulfilled.

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  • 18 Jul 2015

    Festival Of Archaeology 2015 - Forty Hall - Day 5

    garderobe chute

    Our penultimate day’s digging in Forty Hall threw us an unexpected surprise today, as we continued to uncover the Palace wall that we found yesterday.

    We’ve now extended the trench nearest the lime tree avenue until it just touches the edge of last year’s trench. The wall – a continuation of last year’s – appeared to thicken as we uncovered it in the end of the trench next to last year’s garderobe (lavatory) chute, and as we removed the rubble we began to suffer from déjà-vu as we noted a rectangular area of slumped bricks on the wall’s south side.

    Sure enough, just as last year, we found the slumping was caused by a rectangular void backfilled with palace rubble, which has subsequently settled and allowed the surrounding bricks to tilt inwards – the void is yet another garderobe chute, right next to the one we found last year.

    pmr handle

    This second chute is abutted against the wall, and therefore must be later in date, although both appear to be of mid to late Tudor construction. There are several puzzling features of the new chute, including its south and east edges which seem to be built of bricks on-edge, in contrast to the other sides. We will be able to tell more once it is fully excavated tomorrow – we have just about finished removing a layer of sandy rubble in the top and have come to what we hope is the original fill of the chute – this is where the critical dating evidence will (hopefully) be, and is what we ran out of time to look at last year.

    mug base

    Meanwhile, our other important job is to determine how far the main wall runs west of the avenue. After the brickwork runs out, we have followed the demolition cut that removed the wall for a few metres, and have extended the west end of the trench to follow it – finding out where and in what direction the wall turns is critical to interpreting the building.

    We had many interesting finds today, including a second piece of painted Venetian vessel glass, the complete handle of a post-medieval red-ware flagon (above), and the complete base of a black-glazed red-ware mug, with a numeral ‘X’ scored on it (pictured) – probably a tally mark made by the potter.

    Having found two garderobe chutes, we are beginning to wonder if we may have found the palace’s ‘Privy Jakes’ – the communal household toilet block that many Tudor palaces had – in which case there may be more chutes to the east of last year’s trench as well, all discharging into the ornamental moat feature which ran along the building’s south edge.

    This would be a significant discovery, and a very important leap forward in understanding the layout of the palace.

    We’ve got one more day to excavate and record the structures, and the weather forecast is not too good for tomorrow – rain may make digging and drawing difficult.

    Hopefully it won’t put off visitors, since tomorrow is our main public event. After all, it’s not every day you get to see a Tudor Privy Jakes lost for 360 years!

  • 17 Jul 2015

    Festival Of Archaeology 2015 - Forty Hall - Day 4

    the wall

    the intact wall does not run much
    further than the roots (top)

    Better late than never, we finally revealed the wall of the Tudor building we’ve been chasing all week today. In the end, we’ve had to move right back until we almost joined up with last year’s trench – we’ve expanded the test pit nearest the avenue into a proper trench and sure enough, here we find the continuation of the Tudor building.

    The wall only runs intact for a few metres, after which it is difficult to tell whether it has been robbed out or if it turns a corner at some point (or both). The mess of demolition material – brick and tile fragments and a thick spread of mortar debris make it slow progress to pick apart, leaving in-situ elements in place – we are also looking out for signs of a floor surface inside the building. It could be that the isolated block of brickwork we found yesterday was actually part of the wall, and was cut through when the building was demolished, probably around the year 1650.

    school visit

    Sorting this out is crucial to our understanding of the route of the wall and therefore the nature of the building, and so this will be our focus at the weekend – it will probably require opening one last trench tomorrow and so there will be a lot of work yet to do.

    The structural archaeology emerged just in time today, as we were visited by pupils from local primary schools – it was nice to have part of a substantial palace building to show them, as well as members from the Colchester Archaeological Group, who also visited us in the afternoon.

    Our main public event is on Sunday, when we will be giving more site tours to the public, and there will be various stalls on display and people on-hand to explain our work.

    Hopefully by then we will have a more complete picture of this building – as ever, stay tuned!

  • 16 Jul 2015

    Festival Of Archaeology 2015 - Forty Hall - Day 3

    test pits

    Another day of mixed fortunes in Forty Hall, on the third day of our Festival of Archaeology dig in search of part of the Tudor Palace of Elsyng.

    Since trench one has now shown definitively no signs of any substantial structure, Historic England, who visited us today, kindly approved a change in strategy. We have moved back towards the lime tree avenue, closer to last year’s trench and opened two small test pits on the alignment of the building we are after.

    Frustratingly, there is still no obvious wall emerging from the ground – the structure we uncovered last year was very substantial and shallowly buried so it should be hard to miss when we do find it.

    floor brick

    black glazed Tudor floor brick

    The pit closest to the avenue, and only a couple of metres from last year’s trench is so far looking very promising – there is a block of in-situ brickwork in its corner, although it looks to be too insubstantial to be the wall we’re after – it may be an internal feature within the building, which in itself would be excellent news.

    The pit is also producing a lot of rubble and quite a few very nice finds, including part of a glazed floor brick (pictured), which once may have been part of a chequer-board pattern within our target building.

    stoneware pitcher

    stoneware pitcher

    We have also found small fragments of window lead and even a few pieces of window glass and several large pieces of a splendid stoneware pitcher (pictured).

    We found a similar vessel last year, decorated with oak leaves and acorns, which would have been imported from Cologne in the sixteenth century, though this one appears to be undecorated and has not yet been accurately dated.

    tobacco pipe

    clay tobacco pipe

    The smallest find to come from the pit was a small fragment of a decorated Venetian glass vessel, quite late in the day (so no picture yet – stay tuned). It’s only the second such fragment ever found at Elsyng and would have been an expensive import, and a very prestigious item in its day.

    Just before we finished working in trench one, it produced an almost complete clay tobacco pipe, probably dating from the late sixteenth century. We’ve almost finished excavating and recording trench one, and will probably begin to backfill it tomorrow, and concentrate our efforts on our two test pits.

    If there is still no sign of our wall in the area closest to the avenue, we may find that the wall sharply changes direction very close to where we excavated it last year – one way or the other we ought to find out tomorrow.

    We still have three days to go, and we’re determined to get to the bottom of the mystery of the vanishing wall before the week is out!

  • 15 Jul 2015

    Festival Of Archaeology 2015 - Forty Hall - Day 2

    the site

    A glorious day in Forty Hall, spoiled only slightly by misbehaving archaeology. The archaeology of Elsyng Palace has been notoriously unpredictable ever since we first opened a trench here in 1963, and so it came as no great surprise when we recorded and lifted the line of rubble we thought yesterday was lying over a wall, to find it was only the fill of a very shallow linear cut.

    As we noted yesterday, the rubble line was substantially thinner than the wall we were expecting, despite the fact that it was in exactly the position and alignment we had predicted. We extended the trench, as planned, to the north to make sure there is no sign of an interior building floor, and to be sure the wall had not changed direction slightly, but after a hard day’s mattocking we were rewarded only with a skim of ubiquitous demolition rubble.

    no wall in this trench

    the disappearing wall...

    Compared to last year’s trench, there is very little rubble – another sign that we are some distance from any demolished structure. As we said yesterday, this may require a radical rethink in strategy. Tomorrow we may extend the trench south to double-check the line of the ornamental moat runs where we predicted, before changing tack – because the site is a Scheduled Ancient Monument any radical change in the dig plans will need to be sanctioned by Historic England. Luckily, they’re planning on visiting the site tomorrow, so we’ll be able to discuss it in person.

    It’s early enough in the dig not to cause panic yet, but we’ll need to get a grip on the archaeology tomorrow, so that we’re not rushing to catch up with ourselves at the weekend – we’d also quite like to have something interesting to show the public on Sunday!

  • 14 Jul 2015

    Festival Of Archaeology 2015 - Forty Hall - Day 1

    trench 1

    We’ve hit the ground running at Forty Hall this year, as we return for the 11th year in our search for Henry VIII’s Elsyng Palace.

    Last year we (unexpectedly) discovered the wall of a substantial C16th building, just to the west of the park’s lime tree avenue, apparently bounded on the south side by a shallow but quite wide ornamental ‘moat’.

    This year we aim to uncover more of this building and hopefully get a better idea of its size and date, and how it relates to the rest of the palace complex.

    We opened Trench 1 today on a point twenty metres west of last year’s trench, following the line of the ‘moat’ – and therefore the wall. The plan is to get another section across the wall (and perhaps part of the moat), and then to expand the trench into the building, to examine the size and nature of the rooms inside it.

    wall rubble

    a distinct line of rubble crosses trench 1

    So far, having de-turfed and removed topsoil, we have revealed a distinct line of brick rubble, exactly on the predicted line of the wall. This will (hopefully!) peel off tomorrow onto in-situ brick structure, and eventually reveal a floor surface on its north edge.

    The width of the apparent wall is, at the moment, slightly worrying, in that it is much narrower than the building section we saw last year. Hopefully, as we reveal more of it it will get bigger – otherwise we may be looking at a boundary wall rather than a continuation of last year’s building. This may require a radical rethink of strategy. Stay tuned tomorrow!

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